THE GROWTH OF M-COMMERCE AND ITS RELATIONSHIP WITH UX

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As the e-commerce market grows each day, so does the use of different devices to browse on the internet.   According to A World Research, the desktop computer is still the most commonly used device, but mobile technologies have maintained a continuous growth in the last 2 years. The graph above reflects on mobile device usage for online browsing and buying. According to a Nielsen Company’s global research, 80% of the people have used desktops and, in the same sample, 44% have used mobile devices too. In some regions of the world, the percentages of desktop PCs and mobile as the e-commerce market grows each day, so does the use of different devices to browse on the internet.

 

According to A World Research, the desktop computer is still the most commonly used device, but mobile technologies have maintained a continuous growth in the last 2 years.

The graph above reflects on mobile device usage for online browsing and buying. According to a Nielsen Company’s global research, 80% of the people have used desktops and, in the same sample, 44% have used mobile devices too. In some regions of the world, the percentages of desktop PCs and mobile usage are very proximate.

 

 

The data suggests other research as well, such as the small growth in the use of tablets in the last 2 years, the e-commerce market on Middle East and Africa, the less usage of mobile phones in North America, however in this post, this data is mentioned in order to contextualize the m-commerce’s development and trends for the years to come.

 

Following the mobile evaluation indexes, another point to consider is the conversion rate between desktop and mobile. According to Monetate’s research, although mobile visits have been growing in the last 2 years, smartphones’ conversion rates have been smaller.

 

 

Many reasons explain the small conversion rates in m-commerce:

  • Smartphones have been used “on the go”, when the people don’t have time to buy;
  • Users start the buying process on a smartphone and continue or finish it on a desktop;
  • Users already expect a frustrated experience with a m-commerce;
  • The buying experience in the m-commerce is poor (the site don’t adapt to screen size, it’s difficult to compare products, it has few information, the filter tools are limited …);
  • Users have less patience to complete the checkout process (many steps and many forms fields to fill.
  • Smartphone’s internet connection velocity is smaller;
  • Among other things.

All these reasons are related to user experience factors.

 

Therefore, m-commerce needs to rethink the UX planned for these devices in order to increase the number of site visits and conversion rates.

 

In the next posts, we will discuss some of this items and solutions to improvements of the UX.

 

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